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7 steps to building an engineering competency matrix and designing career pathways

7 steps to building an engineering competency matrix and designing career pathways

One of the biggest questions we get when we interview candidates is about their career paths and what Log(n) and our clients will offer. From time to time, I have had an opportunity to implement career paths based on a competency matrix. Having a transparent competency matrix that is shared with the whole company as well as with the prospects helps to build solid trust. Here is an article that walks us through the process of building an engineering competency matrix. Every engineer deserves a clear growth path so they can understand, plan, and execute on meaningful career growth. Providing a framework for this growth (we call ours a competency matrix; it’s also known as a career ladder, or professional…

How to Work in a Remote Team?

How to Work in a Remote Team?

There is a lower turnover rate at companies that use remote workers than those that don’t for a reason – in many ways, it’s a better lifestyle. According to Stanford Professor of Economics Nicholas Bloom, people who work from home are happier and more productive. Though most people usually think that remote work is for freelancers and digital nomads, more and more companies are coming around to the idea and understanding the benefits of having remote workers on the team. By 2020, half the workforce is expected to work remotely. However, only 67% of companies currently allow employees to work from home from time to time and only 38% allow employees to work from home on a regular basis. One of the major benefits of remote work, which…

My Lessons from Interviewing 400+ Engineers Over Three Startups

My Lessons from Interviewing 400+ Engineers Over Three Startups

 Originally Posted on FirstRound.com by Marco Rogers Marco Rogers loves interviewing engineers. Here’s a quick back-of-the-napkin showing just how much: he’s been an engineering leader and hiring manager for the last seven years. Over that time, he’s hired over 80 engineers. To fill each of those roles, he’s personally interviewed approximately 5 candidates on average after initial phone screens. That’s at least 400 interviews or an in-person interview every workweek for seven years — and that’s not counting time dedicated to prep, screening, references or debriefs. Most impressive is that he’s designed a system that has gotten his technical teams involved — and energized — to interview their future colleagues. To him, interviewing is a team priority: engineers on his team…

Understanding This Scientific Theory Can Teach Companies to Hire (and Retain) The Best Engineers

Understanding This Scientific Theory Can Teach Companies to Hire (and Retain) The Best Engineers

Here’s a shocker. For a decade, software engineering positions have been some of the hardest jobs to fill in the United States. The fact is that there are more open jobs than there are qualified engineers. Many candidates are either not initially qualified for the jobs they apply for, or they leave companies soon after being hired. Research firm Forrester predicted that in 2018, companies looking for the most talented recruits in technology fields would have to pay up to 20 percent above the market salary rates for those positions in order to get qualified, long-term employees. If you want to hire and retain the best engineers for your firm, you have to recognize that the most talented recruits are likely to have a lot…